The first ex vivo model of the female reproductive tract

Through the use of microfluidics, miniaturized connected tubes, Dr. Hunter Rogers engineered a simulation of the 28-day hormone cycle used in the first ex vivo model of the female reproductive tract. Rogers has since built a platform device whereby ex vivo experiments can be conducted at the organ-level, weeding out drug candidates before far more costly clinical research begins. View Halo Profile >>

Tell us about your research…

The main focus of my research is the development of microphysiological systems specifically for reproductive biology applications.

Can you explain that to a non-scientist?

Essentially what my work is attempting to do is create models that represent human biology and disease better than traditional cell culture and animal models. These improved models will help us to better understand how diseases and disorders originate and how we can best treat them.

Essentially what my work is attempting to do is create models that represent human biology and disease better than traditional cell culture and animal models.

How could it someday impact patient lives?

The near-term impact of these technologies will most likely be found in their ability to make the drug development pipeline more efficient thereby decreasing the time and financial investment needed to get much needed drugs to the market. The long-term impact will likely be in the area of personalized medicine. We hope that one day we will be able to take a patient’s own cells and create a personalized model that could be used to test the effectiveness of different therapeutics to determine the most promising treatment strategy specifically for that patient.

The near-term impact of these technologies will most likely be found in their ability to make the drug development pipeline more efficient.